Walking the Talk Blog

The Glassdoor top 25: What does it take to be a contender?

[fa icon="calendar'] 09-Oct-2014 19:34:07 / by Amanda Fajak posted in Engagement, Facebook, Apple, Greater-Good, Twitter, Values, Glassdoor, Google, Living the Values, People-First

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Workplace reviewers Glassdoor recently published their annual list of the Top 25 Companies for Culture and Values. Most of us know the roll call for 2014, but what are the common features?

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It's not easy, living by your values

[fa icon="calendar'] 13-Jan-2010 07:52:00 / by Carolyn Taylor posted in China, Values, Google

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Today I read this article about Google and its presence in China.

 
Google is considering withdrawing from China completely because of the continued internet censorship and China-based cyber attacks on human rights activists using its Gmail service. Google is the second largest search engine in China, and China has the largest number of internet users on the world. A withdrawal would be a values based decision. Google"s mantra is "Do no evil", and they went through a lot of soul searching during the process of entering China in the first place. The loss of immediate revenue would be considerable.

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Google: culture as competitive advantage

[fa icon="calendar'] 21-Oct-2009 15:57:00 / by Carolyn Taylor posted in Communication, Values, Eric Schmidt, Google

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In this interview  Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, describes his culture as a competitive advantage. I have spent  time working with Google as a client and found their culture and values to be very alive. Their core value is the statement ‘do no evil’.
 

They got some poor press for this around the time when they went into China, and were struggling with the Chinese government’s attempts to control the content that was visible to Chinese users. My experience of them from the inside was that they treated the situation as a true ‘values dilemma’. I see the role of a good values statement to ensure that you ask the right set of questions. Values create the right conversations in the many instances where a situation seems grey, not black or white. Was it more important to provide internet access to Chinese people, even under restricted conditions, or not to provide it at all? What I admire about Google is that they have those conversations, vigorously, because they feel passionate about what they stand for. They made their decisions within the context of the right conversation.

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